CRIM

Citations: The Renaissance Imitation Mass Project

Code

Tools and Code used in CRIM

Music Notation and Encoding

  • Music Encoding Initiative [MEI], Perry Roland and Johannes Kepper, Project Directors. Open-source XML encoding standard for scholarly editing and analysis of music. Code at: https://music-encoding.org/
  • Sibmei, Andrew Hankinson and Micah Walter, developers. Plugin for Sibelius permitting direct export to MEI format xml files. Code at https://github.com/music-encoding/sibmei
  • Verovio, Laurent Pugin, developer. Verovio is a JavaScript application to render MEI files as notation directly in any HTML5 browser. Code at https://github.com/rism-ch/verovio.

Content Management Systems

  • The CRIM Project, Micah Walter, Raffaele Viglianti, Andrew Janco, and Ian Fisher, developers. Django framework for Citations: The Renaissance Imitation Mass web site and tools. Code at https://github.com/CRIM-Project/CRIM-online.

Citation and Annotation

Data Visualization, Analysis, and Machine Learning Tools

  • Single Interface for Music Score Searching and Analysis project (SIMSSA), Ichiro Fujinaga, Director. Based at McGill University, SIMSSA/ maintains a suite of tools for the analysis of symbolic music files (MEI, MIDI, etc). Code at URL: https://github.com/DDMAL.
  • Du Chemin Data Analysis, Casey Falk, Micah Walter, and Brian Miller, developers. Python routines for inventory and processing of CRIM data, and D3 visualization system using PageRank and other routines for Similarity Networks. Code at URL: https://github.com/bmill42/DuChemin.
  • CRIM Data Analysis, Madeleine Hodges and Tosin Alliyu, developers. Python routines for inventory and processing of CRIM data, and D3 visualization system using PageRank and other routines for Similarity Networks. Code at URL: https://github.com/Mfhodges/CRIM_Project.
  • Verovio Humdrum Viewer, Craig Sapp, developer. Verovio Humdrum Viewer includes various pattern matching tools, for machine-aided reading and analysis of symbolic music scores Code at https://github.com/humdrum-tools/verovio-humdrum-viewer.

Sustainability and Long-Term Preservation

The Centre d’Études Supérieures de la Renaissance and Haverford College are committed to the ongoing preservation of the CRIM resources along with the data, encodings, and other tools used in them.

At Haverford, the long-term support of CRIM (and its predecessor, The Lost Voices Project is assured by the Library (which includes a dedicated staff of Digital Scholarship experts) and IT department (which maintains server space and provides support for software and security for the hosted site and data).

The CESR, as a constituent institution of the French national research foundation (CNRS), is also dedicated to the indefinite support of digital scholarship in the humanities. The digital work of several research groups in musicology and ethnomusicology has been assembled under the banner of the CNRS initiative TGIR Huma-Num, which will provide a permanent repository for the products of digital work in the humanities, including tools, editions, data sets, and critical essays.